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News & Commentary

Local Cambodians Give Testimony, Await Khmer Rouge Verdict
by Josie HuangKPCC
July 25th, 2014
CJA attorney Nushin Sarkarati talks about the importance of testimonies from the Cambodian diaspora for Khmer Rouge trials.
Human Rights Group Donating Records to Duke Library
The Herald-Sun
July 17th, 2014
CJA, a human rights group involved in lawsuits against alleged leaders of genocide in Guatemala and other countries, is donating records to the Human Rights Archive at Duke’s David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.
Two Salvadoran Generals Ordered Deported for Civil War Torture
by Trevor BachMiami New Times
June 12th, 2014
The memories are etched in Melecia del Carmen Casco's face. They show in the deep, thin lines that run across her caramel-colored forehead and in the prominent half-star patterns that surround her small brown eyes. Casco wears a turquoise cotton shirt with matching earrings. Her silver hair is pulled into a tight bun. In the green hills above El Salvador's Lake Suchitlán, she sits in front of her simple home next to a table with a basket full of warm tortillas as her teenage grandson lounges in a nearby hammock. And she begins to remember.
US Encouraging Refugees To Help Human Rights Cases
by Eric TuckerNPR
May 12th, 2014
ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — The Ethiopian jail guard suspected of torturing and maiming political prisoners during that country's "Red Terror" era came to the United States in 2004 under a false identity, seeking asylum and claiming he would be persecuted if he returned home.
Fallo Revive Debate de Amnistía en El Salvador
by Gisela Salomon (Associated Press)el Nuevo Herald
April 28th, 2014
El fallo de un juez de inmigración de Miami generó esperanzas de que se allane el camino de abolición de una ley de amnistía en El Salvador, para que los militares y los responsables de matanzas, torturas y violaciones a los derechos humanos puedan finalmente ser juzgados en su país.
El Salvador: Will General Jose Guillermo Garcia be deported?
by W. Alejandro SanchezVoxxi
April 15th, 2014
The ruling of a Miami judge to deport Army General Jose Guillermo Garcia, a former defense minister of El Salvador, serves as a victory for human rights supporters, despite the difficulties to implement the rule anytime soon.
Salvadoran General Accused in Killings Should Be Deported, Miami Judge Says
by Julia PrestonThe New York Times
April 11th, 2014
An immigration judge has found that a former defense minister in El Salvador, a close ally of the United States during a civil war there in the 1980s, should be deported because of his involvement in a number of human rights violations, including the assassination of an archbishop and the massacre of more than 1,000 peasants.
Pamela Merchant KQED Interview with Joshua Johnson
by Joshua JohnsonKQED
April 10th, 2014
Executive Director Pamela Merchant discusses the Center for Justice & Accountability's work with Joshua Johnson of KQED.
Psychology Association's Torture Link Fails "Do-No-Harm" Ethics
by Roy Eidelson and Trudy BondTruthout
March 7th, 2014
After seven years, the American Psychological Association recently decided to close an ethics case against a Guantanamo psychologist without taking disciplinary action. This is not merely an isolated story about a single individual's reprieve from accountability.
Guatemalan Ex-Commando Loses U.S. Citizenship, Gets Jail Term for Massacre
by Tim JohnsonMcClatchy DC
February 10th, 2014
A federal judge in California on Monday revoked the U.S. citizenship of a former Guatemalan special forces officer and sentenced him to a maximum 10-year prison term for deceiving U.S. immigration officials and covering up his role in a 1982 massacre of 250 villagers in Guatemala, one of the worst atrocities in modern times in Latin America.
Salvadoran Cites U.S. Backing of Violence in Deportation Appeal
by Lalita ClozelLos Angeles Times
February 6th, 2014
A former Salvadoran general accused of overseeing the torture and killing of thousands of civilians during a 12-year civil war appealed a U.S. deportation order Thursday on the grounds that his nation's anti-communist campaign was backed and funded by the American government.
Ex-Salvadoran General Appeals Deportation Order
by Matthew BarakatAssociated Press
February 6th, 2014
Vides Casanova, who was El Salvador's defense minister, has been living in Florida since immigrating in 1989. In 2012, an immigration judge ruled that he could be deported for his role in multiple acts of killings and torture committed by the Salvadoran military, including the slayings of three American nuns and a lay churchwoman in 1980.
Investigating Genocide in Somaliland
by James ReinlAl Jazeera
February 6th, 2014
They say as many as 200,000 men, women and children were executed and buried in mass graves in 1980s Somaliland. They accuse Somalia's late dictator, Mohamed Siad Barre, of atrocities and want to put his alleged henchmen on trial.
U.S. Psychology Body Declines to Rebuke Member in Gitmo Torture Case
by Spencer AckermanThe Guardian
January 22nd, 2014
America’s professional association of psychologists has quietly declined to rebuke one of its members, a retired US army reserve officer, for his role in one of the most brutal interrogations known to have to taken place at Guantánamo Bay, the Guardian has learned.
Reclaman Extradición de ex Militar Chileno Acusado de Asesinar a Cantante Víctor Jara
by Paula BustamanteEl Nuevo Herald
September 11th, 2013
Activistas de derechos humanos en Estados Unidos reclaman la extradición del ex oficial del Ejército chileno Pedro Pablo Barrientos, acusado como uno de los autores del asesinato del cantante Víctor Jara ocurrido en 1973, mientras abogados del artista ya lo ubicaron en Florida.
Ex-Pinochet Lieutenant Living Quietly in Florida Faces Civil Lawsuit from Family of Chilean Poet 'Brutally Tortured and Killed in Country's Military Coup 40 Years Ago'
by Louise BoyleDaily Mail
September 10th, 2013
Victor Jara's family have filed a civil lawsuit accusing former Chilean army Lt. Pedro Barrientos Nunez of ordering soldiers to torture Jara. The suit claims that Barrientos fired the fatal shot while playing a game of 'Russian roulette' inside a locker room in Santiago’s Estadio Chile, where some 5,000 supporters of socialist President Salvador Allende were being detained.
Chile 40 years after the September 11, 1973 coup
by Elena KlaverHemispheres
September 10th, 2013
Tonight Hemispheres commemorates the 40th anniversary of the US-backed coup in Chile that brought to power a ruthless dictator, Agusto Pinochet, whose regime killed and disappeared thousands of Chileans during his dictatorship. We wll hear from Almudena Bernabeu, International Attorney & Transitional Justice Program Director at the Center for Justice and Accountability.
Agony of Chile's Dark Days Continues as Murdered Poet's Wife Fights for Justice
by Jonathan Watts and Jonathan Franklin The Guardian
September 10th, 2013
It is not the only quest for justice in Chile that dates back to the dark days, weeks and years following General Augusto Pinochet's ousting of socialist president Salvador Allende. Thousands were executed or made to disappear, and thousands more tortured after the CIA-backed military takeover. But Jara – folk-singer, theatre director and cultural ambassador of the Allende government – remains arguably the best-known victim and a potent symbol of a nation still struggling to find peace with itself more than two decades since the return of democracy.
40 Years After Chile Coup, Family of Slain Singer Víctor Jara Sues Alleged Killer in U.S. Court
Democracy Now!
September 9th, 2013
This week marks the 40th anniversary of what’s known as the other 9/11: September 11, 1973, when a U.S.-backed military coup ousted Chile’s democratically elected president Salvador Allende and ushered in a 17-year repressive dictatorship led by General Augusto Pinochet. We’re joined by Joan Jara, the widow of Chilean singer Víctor Jara, who has just filed a civil lawsuit in U.S. court against the former military officer who allegedly killed Jara 40 years ago. Jara’s accused killer, Pedro Barrientos, has lived in the United States for roughly two decades and is now a U.S. citizen. Jara’s family is suing him under federal laws that allow U.S. courts to hear about human rights abuses committed abroad. Last year, Chilean prosecutors charged Barrientos and another officer with Jara’s murder, naming six others as accomplices.
Anniversary of Chilean Coup Brings Renewed Calls for Justice
by Mimi Whitefield Miami Herald
September 9th, 2013
Four decades after Jara’s death, a civil lawsuit has been filed in federal court in Jacksonville, claiming that Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nuñez — a man now living in Florida — is responsible for those events as well as the torture of Jara in the days after the democratically elected Marxist President Salvador Allende was toppled and a military dictatorship installed.
Family of Víctor Jara Turns From Chile to U.S. in Quest for Justice
by Charlotte Karrlsson-Willis The Santiago Times
September 6th, 2013
Thousands of miles from where Víctor Jara was murdered, the battle to bring his killers to justice is now making its way to U.S. courts as the family sues Pedro Barrientos, a former military officer living in Florida, for: “torture; extrajudicial killing; cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment; crimes against humanity and arbitrary detention.”
Family of Slain Chilean Folk Artist Victor Jara Says Deltona Man to Blame for His Execution
by Amy PavukOrlando Sentinel
September 5th, 2013
The surviving family of well-known Chilean folk artist Victor Jara, who was tortured and killed in a military coup in 1973, has filed a federal lawsuit against the army lieutenant accused of leading the execution — who has been quietly living in Central Florida. Jara's widow and children accuse Pedro Pablo Barrientos Nunez of Deltona of carrying out a host of violations including crimes against humanity and torture.
Ex Chilean Officer Living in Deltona Sued in Murder of Folk Singer
by Patricio G. BalonaThe Daytona Beach News-Journal
September 5th, 2013
A former Chilean army lieutenant now living in Deltona and accused of torturing and killing a folk singer during the dictatorship of Chile's President Augusto Pinochet should pay for the slaying, according to a federal lawsuit filed in Florida this week by the singer's family. The lawsuit comes as Chilean officials prepare to submit an order from that country's Supreme Court requesting the extradition of Deltona resident Pedro Pablo Barrientos to Chile.
Florida Man Sued Over Pinochet-Era Murder of Chilean Folk Singer
by Javiera Quiroga Bloomberg News
September 5th, 2013
Musician Victor Jara’s family has sued a retired Chilean army officer who lives in Florida for allegedly torturing and killing the folk singer and political activist after a military coup four decades ago. The Center for Justice and Accountability, or CJA, and Chadbourne & Parke, LLP filed the civil lawsuit on behalf of Jara’s family in a Florida district court.
Family Sues over Murder of Folk Singer by Pinochet Regime
by Benedict ManderThe Financial Times
September 5th, 2013
A lawsuit was filed in Florida on Thursday seeking damages against a former Chilean military officer accused of torturing and executing the folk singer Víctor Jara shortly after General Augusto Pinochet’s 1973 military coup.
Family of Chilean Singer Executed in 1973 Files Suit in Florida
by Kevin GrayReuters
September 5th, 2013
The wife and two daughters of a popular folk singer who was tortured and executed in Chile days after a 1973 coup has filed a lawsuit in U.S. federal court against a former Chilean army officer - now an American citizen - they accuse of carrying out the killing.
Family of Slain Chilean Singer Victor Jara Seeks Justice in U.S.
by Mariano CastilloCNN
September 5th, 2013
The family of Victor Jara, the famous Chilean folk singer who was among the first victims of the country's military coup in 1973, has filed a lawsuit in Florida against the former army officer it alleges killed him. The killing happened 40 years ago, and it wasn't until last year that a Chilean judge charged eight former army officers with the singer-songwriter's death. One of those indicted, Pedro Barrientos, has lived in Florida since the early 1990s. That is where Jara's family filed the lawsuit Wednesday in Jacksonville.
Víctor Jara: Familia Demandó en EEUU a Supuesto Asesino
Nation.cl
September 5th, 2013
Acción judicial fue presentada en un tribunal de Florida en contra el ex oficial de Ejército Pedro Barrientos Núñez (en la foto), procesado en Chile como autor material del homicidio del artista. Familia espera que demanda ayude en la extradición solicitada por la justicia chilena.
Family of Slain Chilean Folk Singer Files Suit in Florida
by Pascale BonnefoyThe New York Times
September 5th, 2013
A former Chilean Army officer charged with murdering Víctor Jara, a popular folk singer, shortly after the 1973 military coup has been sued in a Florida court under federal laws allowing legal action against human rights violators living in the United States.
Family of Chilean Singer Slain During Coup Files Suit in Florida
by Chris KraulLos Angeles Times
September 5th, 2013
The family of folk singer Victor Jara, one of the best known of the more than 4,000 people who were killed and disappeared in the Sept. 11, 1973 coup in Chile, filed a civil suit Wednesday against one of his alleged killers, a former Chilean army lieutenant now living in Florida.
Former Chile Officer Sued in Florida for Torture Death of Folk Singer Victor Jara in 1973 Coup
by Frederick Bernas And Luis Andres Henao (Associated Press)Washington Post
September 5th, 2013
The family of Victor Jara claims to have solved the 40-year-old mystery of who killed the revered folk singer during Chile’s 1973 coup, and they’re preparing to prove it in a federal courtroom in Jacksonville, Florida, invoking rarely used U.S. laws that address human rights violations committed elsewhere.
Ex-Salvadoran Commander Suspected in Priests' Killings Jailed in U.S.
by Tracy WilkinsonLos Angeles Times
August 28th, 2013
The long quest to bring the Salvadoran military killers of six Jesuit priests to justice has received a significant boost, human rights activists say, with the sentencing of a former commander -- on unrelated charges in a faraway Boston court.
Ex-Salvadoran Colonel Gets U.S. Prison Sentence
by Bridget MurphyABC News
August 28th, 2013
Human rights advocates called it a step toward justice Tuesday when a federal judge in Boston sentenced a Salvadoran ex-colonel to prison on separate charges as Spain attempts to prosecute him for war crimes during his country's civil conflict.
Violaciones a Derechos Humanos Envían a Prisión a Coronel Montano
by Gabriel LabradorEl Faro
August 27th, 2013
Aunque fue juzgado por fraude migratorio y perjurio en Estados Unidos, el exviceministro de Seguridad se convirtió en el primer militar salvadoreño cuya vinculación a violaciones a los derechos humanos pesó para que lo enviaran a prisión. Montano deberá cumplir 21 meses de cárcel, a la que entrará el 11 de octubre para esperar el curso del pedido de extradición a España, donde es procesado por el asesinato de los sacerdotes jesuitas.
Ex-Salvadoran Military Leader Sentencing Continues
by Bridget Murphy (Associated Press)ABC News
August 26th, 2013
A federal judge presiding over the immigration case of a former Salvadoran military colonel wants to know more about the status of Spain's request for the United States government to hand over the defendant for a war crimes trial.
Lectura de Sentencia Contra Coronel Montano se Pospone Para este Martes
by Gabriel LabradorEl Faro
August 26th, 2013
Los testigos en el juicio por fraude migratorio contra el exviceministro de Seguridad Pública salvadoreño terminaron de rendir sus declaraciones este lunes, en Boston, Estados Unidos. La lectura de la sentencia se pospuso para este martes y los querellantes esperan que abra el camino para tramitar la extradición pedida por España por el asesinato de los sacerdotes jesuitas en 1989.
EUA Acusa a Testigo de Coronel Montano de Ser También un Violador de los Derechos Humanos
by Gabriel LabradorEl Faro
August 22nd, 2013
Este jueves inició la audiencia para sentenciar el exviceministro de Seguridad salvadoreño, acusado en Estados Unidos por fraude migratorio, y requerido en España por el asesinato de los sacerdotes jesuitas. La defensa presenta como testigo de descargo al general Mauricio Vargas, a quien el gobierno estadounidense descalifica acusándolo de ser él, también, un violador de derechos humanos.
Ex-Salvadoran military colonel's sentencing begins
by Bridget MurphyBoston Herald
August 22nd, 2013
A federal judge weighing punishment for a former El Salvador military leader on immigration charges heard testimony Thursday about allegations the defendant committed war crimes before coming to the United States.
Inicia Audiencia Contra Inocente Montano por Fraude Migratorio
by Héctor Silva ÁvalosLa Prensa Grafica
August 22nd, 2013
Al inicio de la audiencia, la defensa del coronel interrogó a la profesora Terry Karl de Stanford, testigo del Gobierno de Estados Unidos. Esta mañana se instaló en Boston la audiencia en contra de Inocente Orlando Montano, por fraude migratorio y perjurio.
El Salvador Colonel Faces Jail Time in U.S.
by Nina LakhaniAlJazeera
August 22nd, 2013
Colonel Montano may have continued living unnoticed in a Boston suburb, working in a sweets factory, if it weren't for the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA), which filed a criminal complaint in Spain against him for the massacre of the Jesuits, five of whom were Spanish citizens. Montano was brought to the attention of the US government after the CJA filed a criminal complaint in Spain against him for the Jesuits massacre (five of the priests were Spanish).
Will Col. Inocente Orlando Montano face criminal trial?
by Nina LakhaniBBC News
August 20th, 2013
The commander of one of El Salvador's notorious death squads, active during the 1979-92 civil war, could soon become the first top-ranking Salvadoran officer to face trial for murder. But if so, he will be tried in Spain, not his own country, where an amnesty protects even those guilty of atrocities against civilians.
Ex-Somali Colonel Told to Pay $15M in Torture Case
by Regina Garcia Cano (Associated Press)ABC News
August 20th, 2013
Federal Judge Mark Abel awarded the compensation to Abukar Hassan Ahmed, who in a 2010 lawsuit said he endured months of torture in the 1980s during interrogations in Somalia. A judge had previously ruled that the former colonel, Abdi Aden Magan, was responsible for the torture
Judgment in Somalia Human Rights Case Deemed 'Historic'
by Kathy Lynn GrayThe Columbus Dispatch
August 20th, 2013
A federal magistrate in Columbus has recommended that a former Somali colonel pay a human-rights activist he tortured in Somalia $15 million in damages. Human-rights supporters are hailing the judgment as historic.
Audiencia Para Dictar Sentencia Contra Coronel Montano
by Héctor Silva ÁvalosLa Prensa Grafica
August 20th, 2013
El futuro inmediato de Inocente Orlando Montano pasa por una corte de Massachusetts, EUA, que el jueves decidirá si lo manda a la cárcel por fraude migratorio y perjurio. Lo que sigue es la solicitud de extradición de España por la masacre de los sacerdotes jesuitas.
Salvadoran Indicted in Priest Slayings to Face Separate U.S. Immigration Sentencing
by Bridget Murphy (Associated Press) Washington Post
August 17th, 2013
Inocente Orlando Montano is expected to stand for federal sentencing on immigration charges next week in Boston, yet it could be the former El Salvadoran military colonel’s alleged war crimes and not his lies on U.S. immigration forms that take center stage.
How a Documentary Changed Guatemala’s History
by Samuel BurkeCNN
Most documentaries record and preserve history–only a few change the arc of history. In Guatemala in the early 1980s, a young American documentary filmmaker named Pamela Yates bore witness to massive crimes and atrocities at great personal risk to make her film. This year, a quarter-century later, her footage became critical evidence used to convict a military dictator of genocide.
“If You Tell Them, You Will Be Killed”: Civil Parties’ Stories Heard
by Mary Kozlovski Cambodia Trial Monitor
June 4th, 2013
A fourth victim impact hearing was held in Case 002 at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. Civil party lawyers questioned their clients, while prosecutors and defense attorneys had limited time to examine them on the facts in Case 002. The civil parties who testified on Tuesday were Cambodian-American Bay Sophany, Soeun Sovandy, and Seng Sivutha.
Somali Torture Victim Who Sued Former Ohio Resident Relieved After Winning Day in Court
by Andrew Welsh-HugginsThe Washington Post
June 4th, 2013
Torture victim Abukar Hassan Ahmed was living in London when he decided several years ago to search again for the man he says crippled him during interrogations in Somalia in the 1980s. It took just a half-hour Internet search in 2005 to locate the former government official then living in Ohio. Ahmed finally got the chance to tell his story in court last week after a federal judge ruled in his favor in a lawsuit against the official, Abdi Aden Magan.
Somali Torture Survivor Finally Has His Day in Court
May 30th, 2013
Today, in a federal court in Ohio, CJA client Professor Abukar Ahmed testified about his torture and unlawful detention during the brutal Siad Barre regime in Somalia. The defendant, Colonel Magan, was head of the notorious NSS Department of Investigations which was widely known to inflict psychological terror and physical torture against political prisoners and civilians. For press on the testimony click here, for a press release click here and for more on the case click here.
Inside the Historic Genocide Trial of a Guatemalan Dictator
by Genevieve JenkinsAlternet
May 28th, 2013
The milestones achieved by the prosecution of Rios Montt significantly elevated Guatemala and its system of justice in the eyes of the international human rights community. This trial did not come easily to the Guatemalan courts, and did not proceed smoothly once it got there. Nevertheless, the successful prosecution was hailed by international observers and human rights groups as a major victory for justice--until the guilty verdict was overturned by the Constitutional Court in a 3-2 decision only 10 days after it was delivered.
Pasado Alcanza a Militar Salvadoreño en Boston
by Liz Mineo (Associated Press)El Nuevo Herald
May 17th, 2013
Montano hoy enfrenta un proceso en una corte federal en Boston por haber mentido en sus formularios migratorios y ocultado información sobre su trayectoria militar durante la guerra civil salvadoreña (1980-1992). Montano será sentenciado en las próximas semanas por esos delitos, pero un crimen de guerra, por el que ha sido acusado en un tribunal de España, juega un papel central en el juicio de Boston.
Guatemala: Las Víctimas del Genocidio
by Ofelia De Pablo y Javier ZuritaEl País
April 14th, 2013
Guatemala juzga por primera vez en la historia el crimen de genocidio cometido durante el conflicto armado interno que asoló el país durante 36 años. Con la excusa de luchar contra la guerrilla, más de 200.000 personas, en su mayoría de origen maya, fueron masacradas entre 1960 y 1996 fruto de un minucioso plan elaborado por el ejército. Uno de los principales artífices de las matanzas, el ex presidente, el general Efraín Ríos Montt, está siendo finalmente juzgado por estos crímenes.
U.S. Justice Dept. Releases Judge’s Ruling on Ex-Salvadoran General
by Julia Preston and Randal C. ArchiboldThe New York Times
April 11th, 2013
The Justice Department has released a United States immigration judge’s ruling ordering the deportation of a former high-ranking Salvadoran military officer over his role in the 1980 rape and murder of four American churchwomen and other crimes there.
Guatemala's First Female Attorney General Takes On Country's Biggest Criminals
by Carrie KahnNPR
March 29th, 2013
The first female Attorney General of Guatemala is taking on some of the country's most powerful kingpins, past dictators and local crime bosses. She's lowered the Central American nation's high crime rate and brought justice for victims of the 36 year old civil war. Dr. Paz y Paz will be receiving the 2013 Judith Lee Stronach Human Rights Award at CJA's 15th Anniversary Dinner.
Ríos Montt and Guatemala’s Genocide Trial
by Jill ReploglePublic Radio International
March 20th, 2013
General Ríos Montt’s congressional term ended in January 2012. Two weeks later, he was indicted for genocide in his home country. Guatemala’s 36-year-long civil war was one of the bloodiest and most vicious of modern times, pitting state security forces and their allies against leftist rebels. By the war’s end in 1996, and in a country one-fourth the size of California, more than 200,000 people were killed or disappeared.
Former Guatemalan Strongman Stands Trial For Genocide
by Jill ReplogleFronteras
March 19th, 2013
More than 200,000 people were killed or disappeared in Guatemala's 36-year-long civil war. It was one of the bloodiest and most vicious of modern times. But one period was especially brutal, the one in which General Efraín Rios Montt was in charge.
In Effort to Try Dictator, Guatemala Shows New Judicial Might
by Elisabeth MalkinThe New York Times
March 18th, 2013
A judge had just ruled that the military dictator, Gen. Efraín Ríos Montt, now 86, should stand trial for genocide and crimes against humanity committed under his rule in the 1980s, a decision Mr. Utuy and other Maya survivors of Guatemala’s 34-year civil war had gathered in the courtroom to hear in person.
The Trial of Efrain Rios Montt & Jose Mauricio Rodriguez
by Emi MacLeanthe Open Society Justice Initiative
March 17th, 2013
March 19, sees the scheduled start date for the oral phase of the trial on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity against Rios Montt and Rodriguez Sanchez. They are accused of being the intellectual authors of the assassination of 1,771 indigenous Mayans of Ixil ethnicity in the Quiche Department, the forced displacement of 29,000, and sexual violations and torture, in massacres and violations perpetrated by the Guatemalan military during Rios Montt’s 17-month rule between 1982 and 1983.
Khmer Rouge: Death of 'Killing Fields' Defendant Ieng Sary During Trial for Cambodia's Genocide Dismays Bay Area Survivors
by John BoudreauMercury News
March 14th, 2013
Bay Area survivors of Cambodia's genocide are dismayed with Thursday's death of a Khmer Rouge leader before he could face justice at the hands of an international tribunal for his role in the deaths of an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians in the 1970s.
Genocide on Trial in Guatemala, Setting Model for Region
by Mary Jo McConahayNational Catholic Reporter
March 4th, 2013
For the first time in history a former head of state, Guatemala's Gen. Efraín Ríos Montt, is on trial for genocide in the country where the crime occurred. Two hundred thousand died over 36 years of armed conflict in the Central American nation, mostly Maya indigenous noncombatants at government hands. The unfolding judicial process has global repercussions, strengthening possibilities for prosecution of other prominent human rights cases.
General Says He Could Not Stop Human Rights Abuses
by Gisela Salomon (Associated Press)The Maimi Herald
February 27th, 2013
A former El Salvador defense minister admitted responsibility for military abuses against civilians during his country's civil war on Wednesday, saying he could not stop human rights violations because of divisions within the armed forces.
Retoma el Juicio de Deportación del Exministro Salvadoreño García Merino
QUE!
February 26th, 2013
El juicio para la deportación del exministro de Defensa de El Salvador José Guillermo García Merino se retomó hoy al norte de Miami (EE.UU.) con tres sesiones previstas esta semana para la declaración de los testigos más importantes.
Former Salvadoran General Denies Role in Abuses
by Christine Armario (Associated Press)San Francisco Chronicle
February 26th, 2013
A former Central American general took the stand in his own defense at a deportation hearing on Tuesday, saying he did not commit or order any acts of torture or extrajudicial killings during El Salvador's brutal civil war.
Guatemala Lucha Contra la Impunidad
by Ana López DelgadoHEMISFERIO ZERO
February 25th, 2013
El próximo 19 de marzo Efraín Ríos Montt rendirá cuentas ante la justicia guatemalteca por actos de genocidio. Guatemala está dividida y es que a pesar de todas las pruebas presentadas para demostrar la culpabilidad de Ríos Montt en la matanza de más de 1.700 mayas indígenas ixiles entre 1982 y 1983, muchos continúan negando esa parte de la historia.
Ex-Dictator Is Ordered to Trial in Guatemalan War Crimes Case
by Elizabeth MalkinThe New York Times
January 28th, 2013
A Guatemalan judge ordered Efraín Rios Montt, the former dictator, and his intelligence chief to stand trial on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity in connection with the massacres of villagers in remote highlands three decades ago.
Ex-Salvadoran Military Officer Accused in Jesuit Killings Gets Immigration Sentencing Delay
by Bridget Murphy Daily Journal (Associated Press)
January 15th, 2013
Human rights advocates claimed a victory after a federal judge in Boston said he would consider a former El Salvadoran military colonel's alleged war crimes before sentencing him on separate immigration charges.
Médico Testifica en Juicio de General Salvadoreño, Dice Que Presenció Masacres
by Alfonso Chardyel Nuevo Herald
December 12th, 2012
Un médico salvadoreño declaró el miércoles en la corte de inmigración de Miami que presenció masacres, atendió a victimas de torturas y sufrió torturas él mismo cuando el ex general José Guillermo García era ministro de la Defensa en El Salvador.
Ex Embajador de EEUU Testifica Contra Ex General Salvadoreño
by Alfonso Chardyel Nuevo Herald
December 11th, 2012
El ex embajador de Estados Unidos en El Salvador declaró el martes en la corte de inmigración de Miami que varias veces le solicitó al entonces ministro salvadoreño de Defensa, José Guillermo García, que despidiera o castigara a los militares que cometían atrocidades pero que éste nunca mostró interés en hacer nada.
Inicia Juicio de Deportación de Ex General Salvadoreño en Tribunal de EE.UU.
by Agencia EFETerra
December 10th, 2012
El juicio sobre la posible deportación del exministro de Defensa de El Salvador José Guillermo García Merino, acusado en su país de participar en actos de tortura y violaciones a los derechos humanos durante la guerra civil (1980-1992), se inició hoy en un tribunal de Estados Unidos.
Almudena Bernabéu la Mujer que Nunca Pierde la Sonrisa
by Elena MandacenMujer Glamour
Dejó Valencia para defender causas de justicia internacional desde su despacho en San Francisco. Esta abogada de 40 años viaja de Siria a Guatemala; de El Salvador a Madrid, en busca de un mundo mejor para todos.
City Man Liable in Torture Lawsuit
by Mark FerenchikThe Columbus Dispatch
November 21st, 2012
A federal judge has found a former Somali colonel who lives in Columbus liable for torturing a human-rights attorney more than two decades ago before a brutal civil war fractured his country.
US Judge: Somali Colonel Responsible for Torture
by Andrew Welsh-HugginsWashington Post (Associated Press)
November 20th, 2012
A former military colonel with a Somali security force dubbed the “Gestapo of Somalia” by its critics was responsible for the torture of a human rights advocate in the 1980s, a federal judge ruled Tuesday in a decision that opens the door for a hearing on potential financial damages.
Holding Salvadoran War Criminals Accountable: The Massacre at University of Central America, San Salvador, 1989
by Kate Hayden and Frederick B. MillsCouncil on Hemispheric Affairs
November 15th, 2012
This essay will examine some new developments in the case of one of the most notorious war crimes committed by the Salvadoran security forces during the twelve year long civil war: the massacre on the campus of the José Simeón Cañas University of Central America (UCA) in San Salvador on November 16, 1989. This is an immensely important issue because it could begin to balance the dialectic between impunity and accountability to the side of accountability. For the first time, a high-ranking army officer may soon be tried for this crime.
No Immunity for Somali Leader Who Tortured
by Lorraine BaileyCourthouse News Service
November 7th, 2012
There is no possibility of immunity for the former Somali prime minister who conceded liability over the mass killing and torture of his people, the 4th Circuit ruled.
4th Circuit Again Denies Immunity in Samantar
by Kathy RobertsIntLawGrrls
November 6th, 2012
In a landmark decision, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has denied Samantar's appeal in the first case to consider the "common law immunity" of foreign officials. The decision denies immunity for human rights abuses like torture and extrajudicial killing and denies absolute deference to the executive branch.
Medical Professionals Who Torture
by Steve Reisner and Kathy RobertsCounterpunch
September 21st, 2012
In the history of state-sponsored torture, a rarely acknowledged truth is that accountability only takes place in countries where the torturing government has fallen from power. Victors tend neither to acknowledge nor to hold themselves accountable for torture.
Salvadoran convicted of immigration fraud
by Milton J. ValenciaThe Boston Globe
September 11th, 2012
Inocente Orlando Montano pleaded guilty in federal court to lying to immigration authorities so that he could stay in the United States, a development that could aid Spanish authorities who are seeking to have him extradited to that country, to face charges that amount to war crimes.
Salvadoran accused in killings of 6 Jesuit priests admits he lied to US immigration officials
by Denise LavoieWashington Post (Associated Press)
September 11th, 2012
A former El Salvadoran military official accused of colluding in the 1989 slayings of six Jesuit priests admitted that he lied to U.S. immigration officials, a guilty plea that could allow him to be extradited to Spain for prosecution in the killings.
Radio France Internationale interview with CJA Staff Attorney Kathy Roberts
Radio France Internationale
August 30th, 2012
Radio France Internationale interview with CJA Staff Attorney Kathy Roberts about the historic judgment in the Yousuf v. Samantar case. This judgment marks the first time that any Somali government official has been held accountable for the atrocities perpetrated under the Siad Barre regime.
KCBS radio interview with CJA Staff Attorney Kathy Roberts
KCBS
August 30th, 2012
CJA Staff Attorney Kathy Roberts discusses the $21 million dollar judgment in Yousuf v. Samantar with KCBS radio.
Ex-Somali PM Samantar ordered to pay torture damages
BBC News
August 29th, 2012
A US court has ordered former Somali Prime Minister Mohamed Ali Samantar to pay $21m (£13m) to seven Somalis who accused him of torture and killings.
Ex-Somali PM Ordered to Pay Plaintiffs in War Crimes Case
by Peter HeinleinVoice of America
August 29th, 2012
A U.S. court has ordered a former Somali prime minister to pay $21 million to victims of torture and human rights abuses while he was in office.
Ex‐Somali PM must pay $21 million for Alleged torture: U.S. court
Chicago Tribune (Reuters)
August 28th, 2012
A former Somali prime minister denied diplomatic immunity must pay $21 million in damages to the victims of his alleged torture and human rights abuse, a U.S. federal court ruled.
Judge awards $21 million in torture lawsuit against former Somali prime minister Samantar
by Matthew BarakatThe Washington Post (Associated Press)
August 28th, 2012
A U.S. judge on Tuesday awarded $21 million to seven people who sued a former prime minister of Somalia now living in Virginia, claiming he tortured and killed his own people more than two decades ago.
CJA Attorney Almudena Bernabeu Wins YO DONA International Award
June 20th, 2012
On June 20 in Madrid, Spain, YO DONA magazine announced that Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) attorney Almudena Bernabeu was the 2012 recipient of its prestigious International Award for Professional Work.
Ex-Prime Minister of Somalia Says He Will Not Contest War Crime Allegations Made in U.S. Court
by Associated PressWashington Post
February 23rd, 2012
The former prime minister of Somalia on Thursday ended an eight-year legal battle by accepting legal liability for alleged war crimes and killings that occurred under the regime of dictator Siad Barre. But he denied wrongdoing and said he never approved any slayings.
Former Somali General Admits Liability For War Crimes
by Nina TotenbergNPR
February 23rd, 2012
A seven year court battle that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court ended in a federal courtroom in Virginia on Thursday when former Somali Gen. Mohamed Ali Samantar admitted liability for war crimes and human rights abuses committed in the late 1980s, when he was the defense minister and commander of military forces in Somalia.
Bay Area Cambodians seek justice in homeland
by John BoudreauMercury News
November 20th, 2011
Six from the Bay Area will be legally represented and could provide testimony during the second international tribunal of Khmer Rouge leaders charged with crimes against humanity.
Three US Survivors To Attend Opening of Khmer Rouge Case
by Men KimsengVoice of America News - Khmer
November 17th, 2011
Three Khmer Rouge survivors will stay in Cambodia for one week to witness the first substantial hearing of the trial to date.
CJA Remembers Fr. Dean Brackley
October 17th, 2011
CJA mourns the passing of Father Dean Brackley who left this world on Sunday, October 16th surrounded by his Central American family in El Salvador after a struggle with pancreatic cancer. Fr. Dean arrived to El Salvador when he volunteered to join the staff at the Central American University the year after the assassination of his fellow Jesuit priests in order to continue their important work. He spent more than 20 years serving and supporting the poor in El Salvador. Father Dean also believed in the importance of accountability for the massacre and worked closely with CJA on the development of the Jesuits Massacre Case in Spain.
Former Salvadoran Official Wanted In Priest Killings Found In Mass.
by Lynn Jolicoeur90.9 Wbur
August 18th, 2011
A human rights group has discovered that a suspect in the 1989 slaying of six Jesuit priests in El Salvador has been living here in Everett.
War Crime Suspect Found in Everett: former Salvadoran official accused of role in Jesuit priests’ killings
by Mark ArsenaultBoston Globe
August 17th, 2011
EVERETT - A former Salvadoran government minister accused of colluding in the infamous killing of six Jesuit priests in El Salvador two decades ago has been living a quiet life in a modest apartment building in Everett.
Salvadoran Ex-Soldiers Face Extradition Over Murder of Priests
by By Stephen BurgenThe Guardian
August 9th, 2011
In one of the worst atrocities of El Salvador's dirty wars, members of the military murdered six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her 16-year-old daughter 22 years ago. Now an extradition battle looms after the defence ministry handed over nine of the 20 accused to the judicial authorities in a move that has surprised many human rights workers.
Khmer Rouge Trial Takes Shape
by Luke HuntThe Diplomat
July 1st, 2011
The initial hearings in Cambodia’s Case 002 have closed. The lines of defence to be employed by the four accused of involvement in genocide are becoming clear.
With Help, Cambodian-Americans Filing at Tribunal
by Men KimsengVoice of America News - Khmer
July 1st, 2011
The Center for Justice and Accountability is helping Cambodian-Americans seeking a place at Khmer Rouge tribunal hearings. Under tribunal rules the victims have a right to file grievances and applications to be witnesses, even if they have fled overseas.
Local Cambodian-Americans play active role in trial of Khmer Rouge leaders
by Rob Strauss89.3 KPCC Southern California Public Radio
May 13th, 2011
On a recent Saturday in Long Beach, survivors of the Khmer Rouge stepped to a microphone to tell stories that are hard to hear.
US Victims Add Calls for More Tribunal Cases
by Sophinarath CheangVOA Khmer
May 11th, 2011
Distance is perhaps one barrier that prevents US-Cambodian survivors of the Khmer Rouge from participating in UN-backed trials underway in Phnom Penh. But that did not stop Chanthorn Pech or Roath Prom from becoming participants in the tribunal’s next case—002—an atrocity trial for four jailed Khmer Rouge leaders.
San Jose Cambodian community awaits justice
by Becky PalmstromKALW News
May 10th, 2011
One of the worst genocides of the 20th century happened in Cambodia, in the 1970s. The extremist Khmer Rouge party, led by Pol Pot tried to create a rural farming society, evacuating people from their homes and jobs in urban areas to the country, where many were killed by the government, starved, or were worked to death.
Long Beach residents' recollections of Cambodian horror will be heard
by Greg MellenContra Costa Times
April 30th, 2011
A year-and-a-half ago when refugee survivors of the Khmer Rouge regime gathered in Long Beach to fill out forms about atrocities they witnessed in the mid-'70 s in Cambodia, they had no idea whether it would make a difference. On Saturday, many of them got their answer.
New York Court to Hear Case Against Psychologist Accused of Torture in Guantánamo Interrogations
April 6th, 2011
The Obama administration has announced that key suspects in the 9/11 attacks will be tried by military commissions at the U.S. military base at Guantánamo Bay—not in U.S. civilian court. There will, however, be one Guantánamo case tried in New York. Today the New York State Supreme Court will hear the case against Dr. John Leso, a psychologist accused of participating in torture during interrogation of detainees in Guantánamo. The case was brought on behalf of Dr. Steven Reisner, who is at the center of a growing group of medical professionals campaigning against the participation of psychologists in the U.S. government’s interrogation programs.
Guantánamo and the Taint of Torture
The Guardian (UK)
April 6th, 2011
On the same day President Barack Obama formally launched his re-election campaign, his attorney general, Eric Holder, announced that key suspects in the 9/11 attacks would be tried not in federal court, but through controversial military commissions at Guantánamo. Holder blamed members of Congress, who, he said, "have intervened and imposed restrictions blocking the administration from bringing any Guantánamo detainees to trial in the United States." Nevertheless, one Guantánamo case will be tried in New York.
Court Shrinks From Probe of Gitmo Psychologist
Courthouse News Service
April 6th, 2011
MANHATTAN (CN) - New York State Supreme Court Justice Saliann Scarpulla said that she sympathized with, but is unlikely to grant, a licensed psychologist's petition to compel an investigation into another psychologist's alleged human rights abuses at Guantanamo Bay.
NY Judge Queries Sides in Gitmo Psychologist Case
The Wall Street Journal (Associated Press)
April 6th, 2011
NEW YORK — A push to shed light on psychologists' role in terror suspect interrogations got a rare court airing Wednesday, as a judge told human rights advocates she shared their "sensibility" but wasn't sure they had legal grounds to force a state investigation.
Gitmo ‘Torture’ Doc now in the Hot Seat
Metro
April 5th, 2011
NEW YORK--The practices of a New York-licensed psychologist will be reviewed by a state Supreme Court judge today, after he was accused of creating U.S. interrogation techniques at Guantanamo Bay that some decry as torture.
Massacre Suspect Wanted in Spain
The Washington Examiner (Associated Press)
April 4th, 2011
A Spanish judge has issued an international arrest warrant seeking the extradition of a former Guatemalan soldier suspected of involvement in a brutal 1982 massacre during Guatemala's civil war, a court official said Monday.
Judge: Ex-Somali leader in US can be questioned under oath in suit alleging rights abuses
The Washington Post (Associated Press)
April 1st, 2011
A judge ruled Friday that a former Somali prime minister who has been living quietly in the U.S. for the last 14 years can be questioned under oath in a federal lawsuit alleging he oversaw war crimes and other abuses against his own people more than a quarter century ago.
Khmer Rouge Victims in US to Get Their Day in Court
The Mercury News
February 26th, 2011
Many Cambodians have lived the lives of ghosts in Silicon Valley, not seen or heard from much, quietly tormented every day and every night with unbearable memories of the genocide that wiped out entire families -- parents, spouses, children, extended relatives.
In San Jose, Talk of Atrocity Reparations
by Pin SisovannVOA Khmer
February 23rd, 2011
Now an American, Sophany Bay is filing as a complainant in the upcoming Khmer Rouge tribunal for four regime leaders. She says she wants to have a monument erected, one where she can keep a photograph of her youngest daughter and where she might engrave the names of her two other children lost to the regime.
Cambodians in US Set to Meet Over Tribunal Case
Voice of America-Khmer
February 23rd, 2011
A group of Cambodian-Americans is meeting in California later this week to discuss their legal options for reparations under the Khmer Rouge tribunal as a case for four leaders of the regime moves ahead.
After 6 Years, Judge Denies Immunity for Former Somali Prime Minister Now Living in US
Canadian Press
February 16th, 2011
MCLEAN, Va. — A judge has denied legal immunity to a former Somali prime minister now living in northern Virginia who is accused in a federal lawsuit of torture and war crimes.
Court Asked to Order Probe of Gitmo Psychologist
The Wall Street Journal
November 24th, 2010
NEW YORK — A court was asked Wednesday to force an investigation into whether an Army psychologist developed abusive interrogation techniques for detainees at Guantanamo Bay and should be stripped of his license.
Taking on The Tyrants: A Bay Area nonprofit helps expatriates seeking justice against their oppresors
Forum Magazine
October 1st, 2010
When Mohamed Ali Samantar came to the United States from war-torn Somalia in 1997, he hoped to live quietly in retirement in suburban Virginia. But thanks to a little-known San Francisco human rights group, the former Somali official instead became the focus of a landmark U.S. Supreme Court human rights case.
Fresh attack on professional credentials of psychologists implicated in torture
The National Law Journal
July 15th, 2010
A human rights group and two law school clinics are going after the licenses of psychologists involved in the interrogations and torture of detainees by the U.S. military and intelligence personnel.
Letter Turns Up Heat on Psychologist
The Washington Post
July 11th, 2010
COLUMBUS, OHIO -- The American Psychological Association is taking the unprecedented step of supporting an attempt to strip the license of a psychologist accused of overseeing the interrogation of a CIA detainee.
Will Gitmo Shrinks Lose Their Credentials?
Mother Jones
July 7th, 2010
If their aim was to break him, his interrogators apparently succeeded. By late November 2002, Mohammed al-Qahtani—a suspected Al Qaeda operative sometimes described as the 20th hijacker—was hearing voices, talking to imaginary people, and spending hours on end cowering in a corner of his Guantanamo cell with a sheet draped over him.
Complaints Allege Psychologists Had Role in Guantanamo Detainee Abuse
Los Angeles Times
July 7th, 2010
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Two Army psychologists helped perpetrate abuse of detainees at Guantanamo Bay including sleep deprivation and sexual humiliation, according to complaints filed Wednesday by human rights groups trying to have the psychologists' state licenses revoked.
Ex President Cristiani knew that there was going to be an assassination attempt on Father Ellacuría.
El Mundo
July 5th, 2010
More than 20 years have passed since the assassination of father Ignacio Ellacuría, ideologist of liberation theology, and four other Jesuits at the hands of the El Salvador Army and the fence around the intellectual authors of that killing begins to close.
Presentan una demanda en EE.UU. contra un ex jefe paramilitar de Colombia
Agencia EFE
July 1st, 2010
Miami (EE.UU.), 1 jul (EFE).- Una organización internacional de derechos humanos presentó una demanda civil contra el ex jefe paramilitar colombiano Carlos Mario Jiménez, alias "Macaco", en un tribunal de Estados Unidos por "tortura, ejecución sumaria, crímenes de guerra y delitos de lesa humanidad.
First Paramilitary Leader Sued in US Courts
Colombia Reports
July 1st, 2010
Extradited Colombian Carlos Mario Jimenez, alias "Macaco," a leader of paramilitary block of the AUC, is the first paramilitary to be sued in U.S. courts for alleged human rights violations. The charges include torture, murder, war crimes, and crimes against humanity, according to the lawyer in charge of the case, Almudena Bernabeu, from the Center for Justice and Accountability.
Colombian Warlord Sued in U.S. Federal Court
Latin American Herald Tribune
July 1st, 2010
MIAMI – A U.S. human rights organization is suing former Colombian militia leader Carlos Mario Jimenez for torture, extrajudicial killing, crimes against humanity and war crimes.
Lawsuit filed in Fla. against Colombian warlord
Miami Herald
July 1st, 2010
A jailed Colombian warlord has been sued by the relatives of two people believed to have been killed by his paramilitary forces. The lawsuit against Carlos Mario Jimenez, who is awaiting trial on drug trafficking charges, was filed in federal court here June 14 and publicized by the plaintiffs' attorneys Thursday.
High Court Allows Torture Suit Against Former Somali Official
Daily Journal
June 2nd, 2010
In a major victory for a San Francisco-based human rights group, the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday ruled unanimously that former officials of foreign countries are barred from claiming immunity under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act for alleged acts of torture.
Ex-Somali official Mohamed Ali Samantar may be sued in U.S., Supreme Court rules
Washington Post
June 2nd, 2010
A group of Somalis who allege torture and killings by the former government of their homeland may pursue their lawsuit against a former prime minister now living in Fairfax County, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.
Supreme Court rejects ex-Somali official's immunity claim
Los Angeles Times
June 2nd, 2010
The justices rule that the U.S. immunity law does not prevent Somalis who say they or their relatives were tortured from suing former Prime Minister Mohamed Ali Samantar, who now lives in Virginia.
Somali In US Can be Sued For Torture
L.A. Times
June 1st, 2010
Washington…Victims of torture at the hands of foreign government officials won a victory in the Supreme Court Tuesday, when the justices ruled federal law does not automatically shield ex-officials from being sued for ordering killings and the abuse of prisoners.
Former Chief of Somali NSS Faces Lawsuit for Torture
Hiiraan Online
April 21st, 2010
Columbus, OH (HOL) - The Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) and Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP have filed a lawsuit against the former chief of Somali National Security Service (NSS). The lawsuit alleges that Col. Abdi Aden Magan ordered the detention and torture of a professor and human rights lawyer in 1988.
Somali Ex-colonel Living in Columbus Ordered Torture, Lawsuit Says
The Columbus Dispatch
April 21st, 2010
COLUMBUS -- A former Somali military colonel now living in Ohio ordered the detention and torture of a lawyer and human rights advocate in Somalia in 1988, an ordeal that permanently crippled the victim, according to a federal lawsuit filed today.
"How we killed Archbishop Romero"
March 26th, 2010
Reduced to ignominy, Alvaro Saravia--an architect of the assassination of Archbishop Romero--has been a pizza delivery man, a used car salesman and a drug money launderer. Now he is burning in the hell he helped create during a time when killing “communists” was a sport.
Así matamos a monseñor Romero
El mayor D´Aubuisson fue parte de la conspiración para asesinar a monseñor Romero, aunque el tirador lo puso un hijo del ex presidente Molina, dice el capitán Álvaro Saravia. 30 años después, él y otros de los involucrados reconstruyen aquellos días de tráfico de armas, de cocaína y de secuestros. Caído en desgracia, Saravia ha sido repartidor de pizzas, vendedor de carros usados y lavador de narcodinero. Ahora arde en el infierno que ayudó a prender aquellos días cuando matar "comunistas" era un deporte.
A California Reckoning in a Case of Abuses Abroad
New York Times
January 30th, 2010
The three refugees from Somalia came to the Bay Area several years ago to escape the violence of their homeland, to put the terror behind them. But they were shocked to learn in 2002...
Army Records Spur Hopes For Justice
Inter Press Service News Agency
December 11th, 2009
Original Guatemalan army records on a scorched-earth campaign known as "Operation Sofia," presented as evidence in a human rights case in Spain, have bolstered hopes for justice among the relatives of victims of Guatemala's 36-year civil war in which more than 200,000 people were killed.
Massacre of Jesuits in El Salvador "Premeditated"
November 25th, 2009
Declassified CIA documents show that the 1989 massacre of six Jesuit priests in El Salvador followed three days of planning by senior Salvadoran military officers, an expert witness said Tuesday before Spain's National Court, which is hearing a case brought on behalf of the slain clerics.
Justicia con 'efecto dominó' para El Salvador
El Pais
November 24th, 2009
Durante 20 años, la masacre de un grupo de jesuitas en la Universidad Centroamericana (UCA) de San Salvador ha permanecido en la impunidad.
20 años después de la barbarie
El Pais
November 17th, 2009
A los 35 años de edad, la abogada española Almudena Bernabéu se ha convertido en el látigo de los militares salvadoreños que durante la guerra civil cometieron crímenes de lesa humanidad.
US court to hear Somali ex-minister torture case
Reuters
September 30th, 2009
The U.S. Supreme Court will rule on whether a former Somali prime minister is protected by sovereign immunity from a lawsuit seeking to hold him responsible for torture and human rights abuses.
Memphian Carranza Found Guilty of Human Rights Abuses
Memphis Daily News
March 19th, 2009
The U.S. Sixth Circuit Court affirmed Tuesday that Nicolas Carranza, a former commander of El Salvador's security forces -- now a naturalized U.S. citizen and Memphis resident -- is responsible for human rights abuses that took place under his command in his native country in the 1980s...
Sixth Circuit Upholds Judgment Against El Salvador Military Commander
Jurist: Legal News & Research
March 18th, 2009
A three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld a district court decision finding former El Salvador chief military commander Nicolas Carranza liable for murder and torture committed during the El Salvador civil war in the 1980s...
Court Revives Lawsuit Against Former Somali PM
Associated Press
January 9th, 2009
A federal appeals court has reinstated a human rights lawsuit against a former prime minister of Somalia who is accused of overseeing killings and other atrocities.
Case of '89 Jesuit Killings in Salvador Revived in Spain
The New York Times
November 14th, 2008
Rights lawyers file Spanish court case on El Salvador killings
New York Times
November 13th, 2008
Nearly 20 years after the Salvadoran Army murdered six Jesuit priests in one of the most notorious incidents of the country's civil war, a criminal complaint filed in the Spanish High Court has revived hopes that those behind the slaughter could face trial.
The Guatemala Genocide Case in Spain
U.C. Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies
August 31st, 2008
CJA International Attorney Almudena Bernabeu and U.C Hastings College of the Law Professor Naomi Roht-Arriaza summarize the history of the case and the historic 2008 testimony of Mayan genocide survivors in Madrid.
Peruvian Massacre Survivor Testifies
Foxnews.com
February 11th, 2008
A woman who survived a massacre by Peruvian army units almost 20 years ago testified Monday against two former military officers, saying she watched soldiers rape and torture women and children.
Peruvian Massacre Survivor Testifies
Foxnews.com
February 11th, 2008
A woman who survived a massacre by Peruvian army units almost 20 years ago testified Monday against two former military officers, saying she watched soldiers rape and torture women and children.
Human rights abusers find haven here
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
April 19th, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For more than two years, U.S. authorities have had a more potent weapon to pursue alleged human rights abusers from other countries who have made the United States their home. The enhanced authority is starting to bear fruit.
Human rights abusers find haven here
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
April 19th, 2007
WASHINGTON -- For more than two years, U.S. authorities have had a more potent weapon to pursue alleged human rights abusers from other countries who have made the United States their home. The enhanced authority is starting to bear fruit.
4.3M Awarded in Torture Case
The Miami Herald
February 24th, 2007
Report on Miami federal jury verdict...
Jurors Hear Details of Torture Case
The Miami Herald
February 21st, 2007
Report on the Dorélien case during trial, after Cajuste's testimony...
The Junta Fugitive, a Lottery Win and a Battle for Justice in Haiti
The Independent
February 17th, 2007
Report on the Dorélien case just prior to trial...
Israel Welcomes Chinese Criminal Against Humanity
Middle East Times
November 22nd, 2006
On Monday, 61 years to the day when the first of the Nuremburg trials commenced to bring Nazi leaders to justice for crimes against humanity, a high-profile criminal against humanity, this time convicted in a US district court, entered Israel - and at the Israeli government's invitation.
Spanish Justice
The Nation
September 21st, 2006
As dusk approached and a light rain fell over Guatemala's Supreme Court plaza, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Rigoberta Menchú sought to buoy the spirits of the human rights activists, local clergy and Mayan women gathered there. "The Supreme Court hasn't given the green light on judging Ríos Montt yet," she said of the longstanding quest to bring the former dictator to trial. "But don't lose hope; we'll fight the rest of our lives to see there's full justice for the genocide in Guatemala."
Former Salvadoran official held liable for torture. Jury awards $6 million to four victims
CNN (AP)
November 19th, 2005
Daniel Alvarado said he was kidnapped by government agents in El Salvador, hung blindfolded from a ceiling, shocked with electrical wires and repeatedly beaten...
Ex-Salvadoran Colonel Is Ordered to Pay for Crimes Against Humanity
The New York Times
November 19th, 2005
A federal jury in Memphis yesterday found a former military colonel from El Salvador responsible for crimes against humanity during that country's civil war in the 1980's and ordered him to pay $6 million in damages...
They live in fear as he walks free
Newsday
November 17th, 2005
Even now, 11 1/2 years after she was gang-raped and beaten by masked men in military uniforms, the woman known as Jane Doe II recoils at giving any hint to her identity or whereabouts...
Torture Suit Begins for Salvadoran Officer
The Associated Press
October 31st, 2005
A former Salvadoran Army colonel was in a U.S. court Monday to defend himself against accusations that his soldiers tortured and killed civilians during El Salvador's civil war in the 1980s...
Haitian women sue former strongman
The Washington Post (Associated Press)
September 13th, 2005
It's been more than a decade, but one woman can still hear the tiny voice that broke through the silence after she was brutally raped by paramilitary officers in Haiti. "Mom, did you die?" her young son asked her in the darkness. "Did you die?..."
Exporting Justice
The Recorder
April 18th, 2005
One morning in November 1981, three armed Somali security officers showed up at Bashe Abdi Yousuf's warehouse. They pushed him into a Land Cruiser, drove him to a detention center and tortured him for two months...
Crimes Against Humanity Verdict is First in U.S.
Daily Journal
April 18th, 2005
Article on a Miami federal appeals court's decision to uphold a $4 million judgment against CJA defendant and former Chilean military officer Armando Fernandez Larios.
'Death Squad' Verdict Upheld
Miami Herald
March 16th, 2005
Article on CJA defendant Armando Fernandez Larios' unsuccessful attempt to appeal a 2003 verdict that found him liable for the 1973 killing of Winston Cabello.
Torture Verdict Is Reversed
The Miami Herald
March 2nd, 2005
A federal appeals court has reversed a $54.6 million verdict against two retired Salvadoran generals -- one of them a Broward County resident -- accused of turning a blind eye to the torture of citizens during their country's bloody civil war two decades ago.
3 Expatriate Women Sue Haitian Rebel Chief S.F. Group Files Suit Alleging Rapes, Beating by Militias
San Francisco Chronicle
January 24th, 2005
One woman was gang-raped twice for being a pro-democracy leader, another was beaten for speaking out after her husband disappeared at the hands of Haiti's oppressive military regime, and the third was raped by paramilitaries as a message to her activist husband...
Ex-Haitian Strongman Sued Over Attacks
The Guardian International (Associated Press)
January 15th, 2005
A former paramilitary leader from Haiti has been sued by three women who allege they were gang-raped and beaten by members of his right-wing group. Emmanuel ``Toto'' Constant, 48, was served with papers on Friday as he left an appointment with the Immigration and Naturalization Service [Immigration Services], said Moira Feeney, an attorney with the San Francisco-based Center for Justice and Accountability...
The Journey of Dr. Romagoza
National Public Radio
November 27th, 2004
Dr. Juan Ramogoza, who provided medical care to El Salvador's poor, was imprisoned and tortured in 1980. He later fled to the United States. Two years ago he sued two Salvadoran generals for his suffering, and won. Now his homeland is honoring him as a "Distinguished Salvadoran Humanist." Ramogoza speaks with NPR's Scott Simon.
Somali Expatriots Charged with War Crimes
The Washington Post
November 11th, 2004
A California-based human rights group has filed lawsuits accusing two Somali residents of Northern Virginia of war crimes, including ordering torture, killings, rapes and other acts of brutality against a rival clan during the 1980s when they held positions of power in their homeland...
Somali Expatriots Charged with War Crimes
The Washington Post
November 11th, 2004
A California-based human rights group has filed lawsuits accusing two Somali residents of Northern Virginia of war crimes, including ordering torture, killings, rapes and other acts of brutality against a rival clan during the 1980s when they held positions of power in their homeland...
Honduras’ Ex-Intelligence Chief Faces Torture Charges
Taipei Times
October 21st, 2004
More than 20 years ago, a journalist called Oscar Reyes and his wife Gloria, an interior designer, were taken from their home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras by members of the country's armed forces as part of an operation against suspected "subversives."
New winds of justice for El Salvador
The Tidings
October 1st, 2004
"For me personally, the verdict provided a strong sense of healing and closure. For almost 25 years, I had carried a bag of heavy rocks with me everywhere I went. The day that I testified, I left that bag of rocks with the U.S. justice system..."
US court orders man behind death-squad killing of El Salvador's archbishop to pay $10m in damages
Independent Co UK
September 5th, 2004
Almost 25 years after El Salvador's Archbishop Oscar Romero was shot with a single bullet in the heart as he said Mass, a court in the United States has found someone responsible for his murder...
Ex-Salvadoran officer ruled liable in killing of archbishop in 1980
San Francisco Chronicle
September 4th, 2004
A federal judge in Fresno ruled Friday that a former Salvadoran air force captain is liable for $10 million in compensatory and punitive damages for his involvement in the assassination almost a quarter century ago of El Salvador's Roman Catholic archbishop, Oscar Arnulfo Romero...
Man Is Found Liable in Killing of Salvadoran Archbishop
The New York Times/Associated Press
September 4th, 2004
A federal judge found a retired Salvadoran air force captain liable on Friday in the 1980 killing of Archbishop Óscar Romero and ordered him to pay $2.5 million in compensatory damages and $7.5 million in punitive damages...
$10m for an archbishop's murder
News.Scotsman.com
September 4th, 2004
The family of an archbishop assassinated while celebrating Mass in El Salvador has won $10m (£5.4m) damages from a retired air force captain who ordered his murder 24 years ago...
Justice Comes for the Archbishop
New York Times
August 31st, 2004
Nearly 25 years after Archbishop Óscar Romero was assassinated while celebrating Mass in San Salvador, a chance for justice has finally appeared.
Fresno suit hearing recalls Salvadoran cleric's slaying in '80
San Francisco Chronicle
August 25th, 2004
The brazen murder of El Salvador's Roman Catholic Archbishop, Oscar Arnulfo Romero, was vividly recalled Tuesday at an unusual hearing in a Fresno courtroom...
The Archbishop, the death squad and the 24-year wait for justice
Independent UK
August 24th, 2004
It was the crime that broke El Salvador's heart. A good man was murdered in broad daylight, yet no attempt was made to bring his assassin to justice. Until today...
El Salvador Slaying Case to Open in Fresno
Los Angeles Times
August 24th, 2004
Relative of Archbishop Oscar Romero sues over his 1980 death. But the suspect is missing...
Ruling details torture claims
The Miami Herald
June 20th, 2004
A judge's deportation order provides details about alleged human rights violations by a former Honduran Army officer accused of complicity in a `dirty war.'
Salvadorian Refugee shares story
Stanford Daily
March 5th, 2004
Students gathered in Bechtel International Center last night to commemorate women’s struggles in the name of International Women’s Day, which is March 8. The event featured three keynote speakers who spoke about their shared pursuit of justice for torture and human rights abuses against Salvadorean civilians.
Obsessive Pursuit
SF Weekly
March 3rd, 2004
Article on CJA client Zita Cabello-Barrueto’s long struggle to achieve justice for her brother's killing.
S.F. Nonprofit Sues Former Salvadoran Commander Group Accuses Man of Torture, War Crimes
San Francisco Chronicle
December 11th, 2003
A San Francisco nonprofit that has successfully sued foreign military leaders for crimes against humanity has again filed suit, this time against a former Salvadoran military commander the group says is responsible for torture and assassinations during the early years of El Salvador's civil war...
Memphian Accused in El Salvador Killings Suit
The Memphis Commercial Appeal
December 11th, 2003
An unassuming great-grandfather who has been living uneventfully in Memphis was accused Wednesday of overseeing military squads who killed thousands of El Salvadorans more than two decades ago...
Bay Area Family Wins Chilean 'Atrocity' Suit
The Oakland Tribune
October 16th, 2003
Article on the $4 million judgment against former Chilean military official Armando Fernandez Larios in a case brought by CJA.
Crime Against Humanity: Jury Finds Ex-Chilean Officer Liable in 1973 Slaying
The Miami Herald
October 16th, 2003
Article on the trial and successful judgment against CJA defendant and former Chilean military officer Armando Fernandez Larios for the killing of Winston Cabello.
Suit Filed in '80 Death Of Salvadoran Bishop
The Washington Post
September 17th, 2003
A San Francisco-based human rights group filed a landmark lawsuit yesterday in the case of slain Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, accusing a former Salvadoran Air Force officer of involvement in the 1980 assassination of the revered Roman Catholic leader...
Modesto man accused in '80 slaying of bishop
San Francisco Chronicle
September 17th, 2003
A Modesto resident was accused in a lawsuit Tuesday of playing a key role in the 1980 assassination of Archbishop Oscar Romero, an outspoken critic of human rights abuses in El Salvador...
A Tortured Path to Justice
by DemocracyNow
September 4th, 2003
We take a look at the case of a torture-victim from El Salvador who confronted two former Salvadoran generals living in the U.S. He won a watershed victory last summer when a jury ruled that the two generals held “command responsibility” over abuses by the military.
Falun Gong Advocates Praise Judge’s Ruling
SF Gate
July 6th, 2003
Falun Gong supporters celebrated a report issued by a federal magistrate supporting the rights of six Bay Area practitioners to sue the mayor of Beijing for his alleged involvement in police abuse of the religious group's members during a 1999 rally.
From Foster City to Chile: Tracking Down a Brother's Killer
San Francisco Chronicle
June 22nd, 2003
Article on CJA's case against former Chilean military official Armando Fernandez Larios, and client Zita Cabello-Barrueto's years spent pursuing justice for her brother's death.
Honduran Death-Squad Victims Seek Justice in U.S. Courts
Pacific News Service
April 21st, 2003
It was past 1 a.m. and Berta Oliva was sleeping when a loud knock on the door jarred her awake. Before she could answer, Honduran government security forces broke down the door, and dragged her husband, Tomás Nativí, out of bed. Berta, three months pregnant, clutched him, but security forces struck her to the ground and knocked her unconscious. She never saw her husband again...
Former Officers are Sent Back to Haiti
The Miami Herald
January 28th, 2003
Reports on the deportation of Dorélien and another Haitian perpetrator, Herbert Valmond, back to Haiti to stand trial for the 1994 Raboteau massacre...
Ex-Haitian Colonel Sued to Pay Massacre Victim’s Family
The Miami Herald
January 26th, 2003
Covers the filing of CJA's civil suit against Dorélien...
Bay Activists Win in Fight to Get Human Rights Cases Tried in U.S.
SF Gate
August 11th, 2002
Bay Area organizations, backed by high-powered corporate attorneys, are taking the lead in a growing movement that uses U.S. courts to go after abusers of human rights worldwide.
Torture Victims Win Lawsuit Against Salvadoran Generals
Washington Post
July 24th, 2002
A federal jury in a civil lawsuit ruled yesterday that two retired Salvadoran generals now living in South Florida were responsible for acts of torture committed 20 years ago by troops under their command.
El Salvador's Vice President Slams U.S. Order Against Generals
San Francisco Chronicle
July 24th, 2002
El Salvador's vice president said Wednesday that a U.S. jury had no right to order two former Salvadoran generals to pay $54.6 million in damages to torture victims of the country's 1980-1992 civil war.
Torture Victims in El Salvador Are Awarded $54 Million
New York Times
July 24th, 2002
A federal jury ordered two retired Salvadoran generals today to pay $54.6 million in damages to three civilians who were tortured by security forces during El Salvador's civil war more than 20 years ago.
Florida Jury Convicts 2 Salvadoran Generals of Atrocities - $54.6 million Awarded to Three Torture Victims
San Francisco Chronicle
July 24th, 2002
Reopening a bloody wound from two decades ago, a U.S. federal court in Florida on Tuesday found two retired Salvadoran generals responsible for torture, rape and other atrocities committed during El Salvador's civil war.
El Salvador Generals Guilty of Torture
BBC News
July 23rd, 2002
Two former generals have been found guilty by a US court of ignoring acts of brutality and torture in El Salvador 20 years ago.
Honduran Linked to Killings, Suit Says
The Miami Herald
July 22nd, 2002
A senior Honduran military officer who lived freely in Miami until his April arrest on immigration violations is responsible for the torture, killings and disappearances of Honduran civilians, alleges a lawsuit filed by two torture victims.
Pilsen Mom Testifies in Salvadoran Torture Case
Chicago Tribune
July 11th, 2002
A Chicago woman took the stand in federal court Wednesday and faced the two retired Salvadoran generals she holds responsible for her torture in El Salvador more than two decades ago.
Ex-Envoy Faults Salvadoran Army Over Torture
New York Times
June 26th, 2002
Testifying in a civil suit brought by three Salvadorans who accuse their country's military of torturing them two decades ago, a former U.S. ambassador to El Salvador said Tuesday that the failure of military leaders to rein in murderous troops had been the biggest obstacle to democracy.
Victim Links Retired General to Torture in El Salvador War
New York Times
June 25th, 2002
The trial of two retired Salvadoran generals in a two-decade-old torture case opened here today with a witness singling out one of them as a participant in a brutal 24-day interrogation.
U.S. Judge in Atlanta Awards $140 Million to Men Who Claimed Torture in Bosnia
The Atlanta Constitution
April 30th, 2002
"A federal judge in Atlanta awarded $140 million in damages Monday to four men found to have been tortured and abused by a Bosnian Serb soldier as part of an "ethnic cleansing" campaign in the early 1990s."
Practical Justice in Doe v. Lumintang: The Successful Use of Civil Remedies Against "An Enemy of All Mankind"
Masters of Terror: Indonesia’s Military and Violence in East Timor in 1999
February 28th, 2002
In a Washington D.C. courtroom on September 10, 2001, US Magistrate Judge Alan Kay brought down a judgment for compensatory and punitive damages of more than $66 million against the defendant in the case of Jane Doe et al versus Johny Lumintang.
Suit Targets Beijing Mayor
Deseret News
February 11th, 2002
The Center for Justice and Accountability announced Saturday it had filed a federal lawsuit against Liu Qi, the mayor of Beijing and president of the Beijing Olympic Committee.
Lawsuit Against Beijing Mayor Shows Falungong Not Forgotten: US Lawyer
Agence France Presse
February 10th, 2002
A lawsuit filed in the United States against visiting Beijing mayor Liu Qi is a sign to Falungong practitioners in China that the world has not forgotten their plight, a lawyer involved in the case said.
Beijing Mayor, Olympic Committee President Served U.S. Law Suit for Persecution of Falun Gong
Independent Media Center
February 8th, 2002
Liu Qi, Mayor of Beijing and President of the Beijing Olympic Committee, was served with a law suit filed in U.S. District Court for his responsibility in overseeing severe human rights abuses against Chinese and international Falun Gong practitioners.
Court Issues $66 Million Judgment in Rights Lawsuit Against Indonesian General
Estafeta
December 31st, 2001
In a strong statement on the seriousness of crimes committed against ordinary East Timorese, Judge Alan Kay ruled in early September to hold Indonesian General Johny Lumintang accountable for $66 million in damages for his role in systematic human rights violations following East Timor’s vote for independence in 1999.
Utah Details Atrocities in Bosnian Trial
The Salt Lake Tribune
October 25th, 2001
"Kemal Mehinovic, a Bosnian refugee now living in Salt Lake City, concluded his testimony in Atlanta this week in a two-day trial against another refugee accused of committing atrocities during the 1992-95 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina."
Judgments Over-Easy - Executions Rare
Tempo
October 15th, 2001
An Indonesian general has been found guilty in an American court. Is there any resounding impact?
Local Group Wins Victory for East Timor Victims
The Recorder
October 15th, 2001
In a case brought by a local legal nonprofit, a U.S. district judge has ordered a high-ranking Indonesian general to pay $66 million in compensatory and punitive damages for massive human rights violations committed in East Timor.
Serb Faces U.S. Damages Claim
The Institute for War & Peace Reporting
October 15th, 2001
"Muslim victims of Serb paramilitary sue him for millions of dollars in U.S. court."
Giving the Devil His Due
The Atlantic
May 31st, 2001
For several years in the early 1990s U.S. intelligence maintained close ties with a Haitian named Emmanuel "Toto" Constant, the founder of a savage paramilitary group that has been held responsible for a prolonged wave of killings and other atrocities. Toto Constant today walks the streets of Queens, a free man. How did he come to find refuge in the United States? Who has been holding up his deportation?
Government to Defend Lumintang Over Rights Case
Jakarta Post
March 28th, 2001
The government will defend Ministry of Defense secretary-general Lt. Gen. Johny Lumintang, who is facing an in-absentia trial in the United States over his alleged role in East Timor rights violations.
U.S. to Resume Military Assistance to Indonesia: Juwono
Jakarta Post
April 15th, 2000
Minister of Defense Juwono Sudarsono has expressed his optimism that the United States will resume its military assistance to Indonesia.
Independent E. Timor Remains Indonesia's Stumbling Block
Jakarta Post
April 5th, 2000
Former president B.J. Habibie was naive when he thought that letting go of East Timor would mean an end to Indonesia's problems.
Government Plays Down Lawsuit Against Johny
Jakarta Post
April 3rd, 2000
Minister of Foreign Affairs Alwi Shihab played down on Saturday a lawsuit filed by two U.S. human rights groups against an Indonesian Army general, saying it was an ordinary case in the United States.
U.S. Rights Groups File Lawsuit Against TNI General
Jakarta Post
April 1st, 2000
Lt. Gen. Johny Lumintang was notified of a lawsuit filed against him by two human rights groups in the United States representing victims of atrocities committed in East Timor last year, a New York-based human rights group said on Friday.
The Assassin Next Door
New Times Inc.
November 18th, 1999
This article focuses on former Chilean military officer and CJA defendant Armando Fernandez Larios. The article discusses Larios’ involvement both in a 1976 assassination in Washington, D.C. and the 1973 killing of Winston Cabello in Chile.
A Safe Haven, But for Whom?
US News and World Report
November 15th, 1999
One evening last year, a 35-year-old Somali computer analyst was visiting a friend in a quiet Virginia suburb when he encountered a man whose name he had heard and cursed a thousand times but whom he had never expected to see–especially here. The computer analyst (fearing retribution, he asked to use the pseudonym Omer) says he was stunned. It turns out the other guest was Mohamed Ali Samantar...
A Safe Haven, But for Whom?
US News and World Report
November 15th, 1999
One evening last year, a 35-year-old Somali computer analyst was visiting a friend in a quiet Virginia suburb when he encountered a man whose name he had heard and cursed a thousand times but whom he had never expected to see–especially here. The computer analyst (fearing retribution, he asked to use the pseudonym Omer) says he was stunned. It turns out the other guest was Mohamed Ali Samantar...
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Epilogue: Expatriate's Odyssey Isn't Over
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 25th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Kemal Pushes On, Driven by One Goal: Family Reunion
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 25th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Halfway There: Kemal Makes It to Adriatic Coast
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 24th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Battlefield, 15 Miles Separate Kemal From Family
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 23rd, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Sarajevo Behind Him, Kemal Begins Trek North Toward Border
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 22nd, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: One Last Look Back as Kemal Escapes Sarajevo
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 21st, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: A Respite From Madness, Then Thoughts of Family Drive Refugee Onward
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 20th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: On the Road to Freedom
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 19th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Salt Lake City Tribune Series on Kemal Mehinovic: Hope for Survival Emerges in Hell: Talk of POW swap encourages Bosnian after 2 1/2 years in captivity
Salt Lake City Tribune
April 18th, 1999
This eight-chapter series chronicles CJA client Kemal Mehinovic's 1994 release from a Serbian concentration camp and subsequent search for his wife and children in war-torn Bosnia.
Foreign Warlords Linked to Nuns' Murder Live it Up in U.S.
by The National Enquirer
August 25th, 1998
Two Salvadoran generals linked to the brutal massacre of American nuns are living in luxury in the U.S. with the help of your tax dollars!